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Eye News

Contacts and Cosmetics

Contact lens wearers who wear cosmetics on a daily basis may be especially vulnerable to eye problems. Misuse of products and adverse reactions to ingredients used in cosmetic formulas cause lens deposits, eye irritation, allergy, dryness, injury and infection. Knowing which products to use and how to use them is important for long-term, problem-free contact lens wear.

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Extended-Wear Contact Lenses

Some people do not consider wearing contact lenses because they think the required cleaning, disinfecting, storing, and inserting are too much trouble. They may also want the option of occasionally napping or sleeping with their contacts in their eyes.

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Tinted Contacts

Many types of tinted contact lenses are available. They can enhance and even change the color of one’s eyes for cosmetic purposes, for costumes, or provide special effects for the movie industry.
Tinted contacts can make light eyes more blue, green or hazel. They can alter the color of the eyes, such as making brown eyes blue.

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Contact Lenses

Over 24 million people choose contact lenses to correct vision. When used with care and proper supervision, contacts are a safe and effective alternative to eyeglasses. And with today’s new lens technology, many people who wear eyeglasses can also successfully wear contacts.

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Recycling Eyeglasses

The World Health Organization estimates that corrective lenses can improve the eyesight of one-fourth of the world’s population. Unfortunately, for many people a pair of glasses is both unaffordable and unobtainable. The donation of old but useful eyeglasses to the needy in the US and abroad can help solve this problem.

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Sunglasses

Sunglasses are popular for comfort and fashion, but now there is medical evidence supporting the use of sunglasses to protect the long-term health of the eyes.
More than a dozen studies have shown that spending hours in the sun without proper eye protection can increase the chances of developing age-related eye diseases like cataracts and macular degeneration. Ophthalmologists now recommend wearing UV-absorbent sunglasses and brimmed hats when in the sun long enough to get a suntan or sunburn.

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Video Display Terminals

Complaints of eye discomfort and fatigue are becoming more common as use of video display terminals (VDTs) increases. While it is true that VDTs can cause eyestrain, there is no convincing evidence that VDTs can harm the eyes.

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Eye Care Facts and Myths

Myth
Reading in dim light is harmful to your eyes.
It is not harmful to watch a welder or look at the sun if you squint, or look through narrowed eyelids.
Using a computer, or video display terminal (VDT), is harmful to the eyes.
If you use your eyes too much, you wear them out.
Wearing poorly-fit glasses damages your eyes.
Wearing poorly-fit contacts does not harm your eyes.
You do not need to have your eyes checked until you are in your 40s or 50s.
Safety goggles are more trouble than they’re worth.

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How to Insert Eye Drops

How to Insert Eye Drops

1. Tilt your head back
2. Pull your lower lid away from the eye to form a “pocket” by pulling the lower lid down with index finger pinching the lid outward with thumb and index finger

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How to View an Eclipse

Looking at an eclipse is as dangerous as staring at the unblocked sun, and can cause damage to the retina, the light sensitive nerve layer at the back of the eye. The damage affects the macula, the part of the retina responsible for central vision.

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Legal Blindness

Normal vision, or 20/20, means a person sees the smallest letters or pictures on an eye chart when standing 20 feet away from the chart. Some people cannot see normally,  even with glasses or contacts,  because a medical condition affects their vision. These people...

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Color Blindness

Color blindness (color vision deficiency) is a condition in which certain colors cannot be detected. There are two types of color vision difficulties: inherited (congenital) problems that you have at birth, and problems that develop later in life. People born with...

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Low Vision

Low Vision

Over three million people in the United States do not have normal vision even with corrective lenses. If ordinary eyeglasses do not provide clear vision, one is said to have low vision. This should not be confused with blindness. People with low vision still have useful vision that can often be improved with low-vision devices.

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Smoking and Eye Disease

Tobacco smoking is directly linked to many adverse health effects, including high blood pressure, heart disease and cancer. Smoking is also linked to specific eye disease.

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Living With One Good Eye

People who lose vision in one eye because of an injury or a medical condition must adapt to a narrower field of vision and loss of depth perception. They still see small objects as well as before, assuming the other eye is normal.

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Jump-Starting Your Car

Many people in Wisconsin suffer severe eye injuries every year because they do not take proper precautions while jump-starting their car. A spark caused by hooking up the jumper cables can ignite fumes and cause the battery to explode. Battery acid and flying battery parts can blind you.

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Tanning Beds

Tanning beds produce high levels of ultra-violet (UV) light that tan the skin and burn the cornea, the clear covering of the eye. The burn is not felt until 6-12 hours after exposure, so you can suffer a severe burn without realizing it. UV light may also cause cataracts, and be a factor in the development of macular degeneration.

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Fireworks

Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people every year in the US. One quarter of these eye injuries result in permanent loss of vision or blindness.

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Champagne Corks

A flying champagne cork is an unguided missile capable of ruining anyone’s party. Since they are small enough to pass by protective facial bones and can travel at high speeds, corks can be very dangerous projectiles and have been known to blind people.

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Workplace Eye Safety

Eye injuries at work are common. Every year about 70,000 workers injure their eyes. Luckily, 90 percent of all workplace eye injuries are preventable with the use of proper safety eyewear. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that eye injuries in the workplace cost over $467 million annually.

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Sports Eye Injuries

Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat nearly 40,000 victims of sports eye injuries. All professional and recreational athletes participating in eye-hazardous sports need to wear eye protection. To help prevent sports eye injuries, protective polycarbonate eyewear should be worn whether or not prescription eyewear is needed.

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Preventing Eye Injuries

Any activity where something is flying at the eye puts the eye at risk for an injury. Over one million people suffer eye injuries each year in the United States. Almost 50% of these accidents occur at home and over 90% of them could have been prevented.

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First Aid for Eye Injuries

The most common type of eye injury that needs immediate action is a chemical burn. Alkaline materials (lye, plasters, cements, and ammonia), solvents, acids, and detergents can be harmful to the eye. Eyes should be flushed liberally with water if exposed to any of these agents.

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