Questions?
Send Us A Message

Fireworks

Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people every year in the US. One quarter of these eye injuries result in permanent loss of vision or blindness.

The single most dangerous type of firework is the small, explosive bottle rocket. Their erratic flight causes injuries to users and bystanders alike. Sparklers, often given to young children, burn at 1800 degrees Fahrenheit, nearly hot enough to melt gold.

To avoid the dangers of fireworks, attend public firework displays instead of using fireworks at home. Amateur backyard displays are dangerous to the person lighting the fireworks and to nearby family members, friends, and neighbors. Celebrate safely by letting the professionals put on the show.

At a public fireworks display, follow these safety tips to keep you and your family safe:

  • Leave the lighting of fireworks to trained professionals-not only is it safer, it is also cheaper and more spectacular.
  • Respect safety barriers set up to allow the pyrotechnicians (or firework professionals) to do their jobs safely.
  • For the best and safest view, stand at least 500 feet, or up to a quarter of a mile, away.
  • Follow directives given by event ushers and public safety personnel such as police and fire fighters.
  • If you find unexploded fireworks remains, do not touch them. Immediately contact local fire or police departments.
  • Most importantly, never let your child play with fireworks. Ever.

If a fireworks injury to the eye does occur, do not touch the eye. Get medical attention immediately.

Eye Safety

Champagne Corks

A flying champagne cork is an unguided missile capable of ruining anyone’s party. Since they are small enough to pass by protective facial bones and can travel at high speeds, corks can be very dangerous projectiles and have been known to blind people.

It is important to handle champagne bottles correctly and safely. Be sure the bottle is cold before opening the champagne. The cork in a warm bottle is more likely to pop unexpectedly. Chilling champagne to 45 degrees Fahrenheit also improves its taste.

After removing the cork’s foil covering, carefully remove the wire hood while holding the cork down with the palm of your hand.

Point the bottle away from yourself and others. Place a towel over the top of the bottle and tilt it at a 45-degree angle. Grasp the cork, and slowly and firmly twist it to break the seal.

Keeping the bottle at a 45-degree angle, hold it firmly with one hand and use the other hand to slowly turn the cork with a slight upward pull. Continue twisting until the cork is almost out of the neck of the bottle. Counter the force of the cork using slight downward pressure just as the cork breaks free from the bottle.

Eye Safety

  • Fireworks

    Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people …read more »
  • Workplace Eye Safety

    Eye injuries at work are common. Every year about 70,000 workers injure their eyes. Luckily, 90 percent of all workplace …read more »
  • Sports Eye Injuries

    Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat nearly 40,000 victims of sports eye injuries. All professional and recreational athletes participating in …read more »
  • Preventing Eye Injuries

    Any activity where something is flying at the eye puts the eye at risk for an injury. Over one million …read more »
  • First Aid for Eye Injuries

    The most common type of eye injury that needs immediate action is a chemical burn. Alkaline materials (lye, plasters, cements, …read more »

Workplace Eye Safety

Eye injuries at work are common. Every year about 70,000 workers injure their eyes. Luckily, 90 percent of all workplace eye injuries are preventable with the use of proper safety eyewear. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that eye injuries in the workplace cost over $467 million annually.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provides regulations which employers and employees must follow. OSHA reports that nearly three out of every five workers injured were not wearing eye protection at the time of their accident. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) provides these standards of eye protection for any workplace task.

  • Unprotected workers will not knowingly be subjected to environmental hazards.
  • Protective eyewear is required whenever there is a reasonable probability eye injury may occur.
  • Employers must provide the type of eye protection best suited to the task to be performed.
  • Employees are required to use the eye protectors provided.

Eye Safety

  • Fireworks

    Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people …read more »
  • Champagne Corks

    A flying champagne cork is an unguided missile capable of ruining anyone's party. Since they are small enough to pass …read more »
  • Sports Eye Injuries

    Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat nearly 40,000 victims of sports eye injuries. All professional and recreational athletes participating in …read more »
  • Preventing Eye Injuries

    Any activity where something is flying at the eye puts the eye at risk for an injury. Over one million …read more »
  • First Aid for Eye Injuries

    The most common type of eye injury that needs immediate action is a chemical burn. Alkaline materials (lye, plasters, cements, …read more »

Sports Eye Injuries

Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat nearly 40,000 victims of sports eye injuries. All professional and recreational athletes participating in eye-hazardous sports need to wear eye protection. To help prevent sports eye injuries, protective polycarbonate eyewear should be worn whether or not prescription eyewear is needed.

The sports that cause the most eye injuries are basketball, baseball and racket sports, but any sport where something flies at the eye is considered hazardous. Unbreakable glasses, goggles or facemasks are required when there is a potential for eye injury.  Polycarbonate lenses are unbreakable and make excellent protection for the eyes.

Helmets with eye shields are recommended for football and other contact sports. Many sports, such as baseball, hockey and men’s lacrosse require a helmet with polycarbonate face mask or wire shield. Face guards can be worn over glasses, and are used primarily for football, ice hockey and similar high-risk sports. Some sports at the national level, such as hockey, have established standards for eye protection.

Goggles or sports glasses protect eyes while playing basketball, racquet sports, handball, and soccer. These goggles should be made of polycarbonate, which is 20 times stronger than ordinary eyeglass material. Prescription eyewear used during sports should be made from polycarbonate.

For high-speed sports such as skiing, wear special frames sturdy enough to protect the eyes from any impact. Wear ultraviolet absorbing goggles or sunglasses while skiing to protect the eyes from glare, ultraviolet rays and exposure to weather.

Boxing presents a high risk for eye injury, and unfortunately, there is no adequate protection available.

Contact lenses are not a form of protective eyewear. Contact lens wearers require additional protection when participating in sports.

People with only one eye should carefully consider the risks of contact sports.  Wearing adequate eye protection is essential for people with only one eye.

Eye Safety

  • Fireworks

    Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people …read more »
  • Champagne Corks

    A flying champagne cork is an unguided missile capable of ruining anyone's party. Since they are small enough to pass …read more »
  • Workplace Eye Safety

    Eye injuries at work are common. Every year about 70,000 workers injure their eyes. Luckily, 90 percent of all workplace …read more »
  • Preventing Eye Injuries

    Any activity where something is flying at the eye puts the eye at risk for an injury. Over one million …read more »
  • First Aid for Eye Injuries

    The most common type of eye injury that needs immediate action is a chemical burn. Alkaline materials (lye, plasters, cements, …read more »

Preventing Eye Injuries

Any activity where something is flying at the eye puts the eye at risk for an injury. Over one million people suffer eye injuries each year in the United States. Almost 50% of these accidents occur at home and over 90% of them could have been prevented.

Minor injuries to the cornea (the clear, protective covering over the front of the eye) can be quite painful. A corneal abrasion is a scratch. Appropriate treatment may include an antibiotic drop or ointment and an eye patch for comfort. Sand or other particles can stick to the cornea. Such foreign bodies may be removed with a moistened Q-tip, usually by a doctor. Do not rub the eye.

Regular prescription glasses or contact do not protect eyes from injury. Some glasses and some types of contact lenses shatter if the eye is hit. People who play sports and wear prescription glasses can have special glasses or prescription goggles made.

Unfortunately, many people do not think they are at risk for an eye injury until the injury occurs. The majority of eye injuries are easily prevented. Follow safety precautions and use common sense to reduce the risk.

  • Wear safety goggles when using powerful chemicals. Goggles should fit properly to prevent chemicals from getting under them, but still allow air to circulate between the eye and the lens.
  • Polycarbonate sports goggles are recommended for all participants of high-impact sports or activities where there is a high risk of eye injury.
  • Never use fireworks. Attend public firework displays instead of using fireworks at home. Amateur backyard displays are dangerous to the person lighting the fireworks, near by family members, friends, and neighbors.
  • Supervise children when they are handling potentially dangerous items, such as pencils, scissors and penknives. Be aware that even common household items such as paper clips, elastic cords, wire coat hangers, rubber bands and fishhooks can cause serious eye injury.
  • Avoid projectile toys such as darts and bows and arrows. Do not allow children to play with air-powered rifles, pellet guns and BB guns. They are extremely dangerous and have been reclassified as firearms and removed from toy departments.
  • Wear eye protection while mowing the lawn or using a weed eater. Stones and debris thrown from moving blades can cause severe eye injuries.
  • Always check to make sure any spray nozzle faces away from the face.
  • Use grease shields to cover frying pans and protect eyes from splattering liquids.
  • Wear opaque eyeglasses or goggles to shield eyes and block UV light in tanning booths.
  • Read instructions before using tools, chemicals, ammonia, etc.
  • Be sure you read the instructions while jump starting a car. Attach the negative ground of the dead battery last.  This cable should be attached to the engine away from the dead battery terminal. Never attach a cable to the negative terminal of the dead battery.
  • Never use a match or lighter to look under the hood of a car.

When an eye injury does occur, have an ophthalmologist (eye physician and surgeon), or other medical doctor examine the eye as soon as possible. Although the injury may not look or feel serious, it could cause serious damage to your eyes. If you have blurred vision, partial loss of vision, double vision, or sharp pains in your eye after an accident, see an ophthalmologist or go to a hospital emergency room right away.

Eye Safety

  • Fireworks

    Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people …read more »
  • Champagne Corks

    A flying champagne cork is an unguided missile capable of ruining anyone's party. Since they are small enough to pass …read more »
  • Workplace Eye Safety

    Eye injuries at work are common. Every year about 70,000 workers injure their eyes. Luckily, 90 percent of all workplace …read more »
  • Sports Eye Injuries

    Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat nearly 40,000 victims of sports eye injuries. All professional and recreational athletes participating in …read more »
  • First Aid for Eye Injuries

    The most common type of eye injury that needs immediate action is a chemical burn. Alkaline materials (lye, plasters, cements, …read more »

First Aid for Eye Injuries

The most common type of eye injury that needs immediate action is a chemical burn. Alkaline materials (lye, plasters, cements, and ammonia), solvents, acids, and detergents can be harmful to the eye. Eyes should be flushed liberally with water if exposed to any of these agents.

If sterile solutions are readily available, use them to flush the affected eye. If not, go to the nearest sink, shower or hose and begin washing the eye with large amounts of water. If the eye has come in contact with an alkaline agent, it is important to flush the eye for ten minutes or more. Make sure water is getting under the upper and lower eyelids.

Abrasions or scratches of the eyelids or cornea, the clear covering of the eye, occur frequently and can be quite uncomfortable. If the abrasion is dirty, gently cleanse the area with a stream of clean water.

Do not attempt to treat severe blunt trauma or penetrating injuries to the eye. Tape a paper or Styrofoam cup over the injured eye to protect it until proper care can be obtained.

In the case of a blow to the eye, do not assume the injury is minor. The eye should be examined thoroughly by an ophthalmologist because vision-threatening damage could be hidden.

First aid is only the first step for emergency treatment. If you experience pain, impaired vision, or any possibility of eye damage, call your ophthalmologist or go the emergency room immediately.

Eye Safety

  • Fireworks

    Fireworks rupture the eyeball, burn the eye and face, cut eyelids, and cause corneal abrasions in approximately two thousand people …read more »
  • Champagne Corks

    A flying champagne cork is an unguided missile capable of ruining anyone's party. Since they are small enough to pass …read more »
  • Workplace Eye Safety

    Eye injuries at work are common. Every year about 70,000 workers injure their eyes. Luckily, 90 percent of all workplace …read more »
  • Sports Eye Injuries

    Every year, hospital emergency rooms treat nearly 40,000 victims of sports eye injuries. All professional and recreational athletes participating in …read more »
  • Preventing Eye Injuries

    Any activity where something is flying at the eye puts the eye at risk for an injury. Over one million …read more »